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Showing posts from April, 2019

Is CBD Isolate Right For Me?

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Cannabidiol,  commonly known as CBD, is one of the fastest growing products and  industries growing today. But what exactly is CBD and is its purified  isolate form something you should be considering? First, let's look at  why people take CBD.  Derived from Hemp or Marijuana,CBD contains no THC meaning that it does not get you "high"(Click the link)or "buzzed" in any way like Cannabis does. This means that you can get  all of the benefits of medical marijuana without actually having to  consume a substance that has psychoactive properties. This is one of the  reasons it is growing so quickly in popularity globally, it does not  get you high but you get the benefits nonetheless.
Why is CBD  consumed? There is still much research ongoing regarding its efficacy  for a variety of different chronic illnesses and ailments but the  current verdict is promising. CBD is taken regularly by patients  suffering from: chronic pain, anxiety/depression, trouble sleeping or i…

Bedtime protein for bigger gains? Here's the scoop

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Drinking a casein shake just before overnight sleep increases gains in muscle mass and strength in response to resistance exercise. But to date, no study has directly addressed whether this effect is due to increased total protein intake only, or if a bedtime beverage is better. According to a review published in Frontiers in Nutrition, existing findings nevertheless suggest that overnight sleep is a unique nutritional window for boosting muscle gains -- while late-night protein calories needn't increase body fat. Casein point: Snijders' seminal study "Several one-night studies have shown that pre-sleep protein intake increases muscle protein synthesis during overnight sleep in young adults" says lead author Dr. Tim Snijders, Assistant Professor at Maastricht University. "These have fueled the idea that over a longer period, a pre-sleep protein supplement can maximize the strength and muscle mass gains during regular resistance exercise training." Snijders&…

Moderate muscle strength may lower risk for type 2 diabetes

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Of the 30 million Americans with diabetes, 90 to 95 percent have type 2, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New research shows building muscle strength may be one way to lower risk for the disease. The study of more than 4,500 adults found moderate muscle mass reduced the risk for type 2 diabetes by 32 percent. The benefits were independent of cardiorespiratory fitness, and higher levels of muscle strength did not provide additional protection. The findings are published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. DC (Duck-chul) Lee, associate professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University and corresponding author of the study, says the results are encouraging because even small amounts of resistance exercise may be helpful in preventing type 2 diabetes by improving muscle strength. However, it is difficult to recommend an optimal level as there are no standardized measurements for muscle strength, he said. "Naturally, people will want to know how often …

How sleep loss may contribute to adverse weight gain

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In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University now demonstrate that one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition. The study is published in the scientific journal Science Advances. Epidemiological studies have shown that the risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes is elevated in those who suffer from chronic sleep loss or who carry out shift work. Other studies have shown an association between disrupted sleep and adverse weight gain, in which fat accumulation is increased at the same time as the muscle mass is reduced -- a combination that in and of itself has been associated with numerous adverse health consequences. Researchers from Uppsala and other groups have in earlier studies shown that metabolic functions that are regulated by e.g. skeletal muscle and adipose tissue are adversely affect…

Go for a run or eat chocolate: A choice dictated by the cannabinoid receptors

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Physical inactivity is a common factor in lifestyle diseases -- and one that is often linked to the excessive consumption of fatty and/or sugary foods. The opposite scenario of excessive physical activity at the expense of caloric intake can also be harmful, as cases of anorexia nervosa illustrate. These data therefore point to the crucial need to research the neurobiological processes that control the respective motivations for exercise and food intake. A study by Inserm and CNRS researchers published on March 7, 2019 in JCI Insight reveals that the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors play an essential role in the choice between running and eating chocolatey food. The authors of this paper had previously reported that the cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors, present on several types of neurons, play a key role in performance during physical activity in mice. A conclusion based on the performances achieved by animals with free access to an exercise wheel -- a model in which it was not …

Better cardio respiratory fitness leads to longer life

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Elite performers had an 80 percent reduction in mortality risk when compared to lower performers.
Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life, with no limit to the benefit of aerobic fitness. Researchers retrospectively studied 122,007 patients who underwent exercise treadmill testing at Cleveland Clinic between Jan. 1, 1991, and Dec. 31, 2014, to measure all-cause mortality relating to the benefits of exercise and fitness. The paper was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open. The study found that increased cardiorespiratory fitness was directly associated with reduced long-term mortality, with no limit on the positive effects of aerobic fitness. Extreme aerobic fitness was associated with the greatest benefit, particularly in older patients (70 and older) and in those with hypertension. "Aerobic fitness is something that most patients can control. And we found in our study there is n…